MICROBIOME: WHY A FEW TRILLION GERMS CAN BE A GOOD THING

Trillions of bacteria, viruses, parasites and fungi live in and around our bodies. Together, they make up the microbiome, which has been called the largest organ in the human body and been linked to a range of health issues, from asthma to diabetes to inflammatory bowel disease to obesity. 

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Red Swoop

Join Paul Kubes and Kathy McCoy, professors at UCalgary’s Cumming School of Medicine and researchers at the Western Canadian Microbiome Centre, as they share the science of the microbiome and why it holds the key to better health for all of us.

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS

Paul Kubes is a professor in the University of Calgary's Cumming School of Medicine, and director of the Snyder Institute for Chronic Diseases. His research interests are in models of acute and chronic inflammation, studying how different leukocytes (neutrophils, monocytes and lymphocytes, etc.) traffic to sites of inflammation, and the role of different immune receptors in the initiation of inflammation.

Kathy McCoy is a professor in the Cumming School of Medicine and director of the Western Canadian Microbiome Centre.

DATE AND TIME

Microbiome: Why a few trillion germs can be a good thing

Recorded on April 18, 2017


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